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Overcoming setbacks, finding resilience, and avoiding burnout with Eloise Du Luart, Professional Triathlete

In this episode, Eloise du Luart shares her approach to training performance and how she handles injuries, overcomes setbacks, and maintains a healthy balance without burnout. Eloise shares many unique insights into her training mentality as a professional triathlete. 

Podcast Banner Image Credit: Jeff Thoren

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Top 3 Hip Mobility Exercises (No Equipment!)

Every time I stand up after sitting down for too long at my desk, my hips make that horrible crack – crack – crack sound. Past injuries and intensive training as a young athlete has left my body feeling older than it really is.

Here are some of our top mobility exercises to keep those hips supple and strong –

Single Leg Glute Bridge

Take glute bridges to the next level and perform some single leg bridges on each side to work your glutes, which are important for controlling lateral stability, hip extension, and internal and external hip rotation.

Well+Good has a great video on YouTube explaining the right way to engage your muscles in this mobility movement, and explains the most common mistakes that can make it less effective.

I personally also focus on creating a motivational space for myself on Instagram by following fitness/mindset coaches like Jibby or Ben Patrick.

Cat-Cow

One of my all-time favourite yoga positions and mobility exercises is the cat-cow flow which targets the spine. Improving mobility in the extension and flexion of the spine helps us build strength in the correct neutral position which improves posture and hip mobility.

Adriene describes this move as a “little dance up the spine that is perfect for beginners” and explains the progression well in her YouTube Video.

Lateral Lunges

Taking standard forward and backward lunges into a different directional plane targets all the same muscles plus the inner thigh muscles (adductors). Lateral lunges are great for working the gluteus medius muscle which builds stability in the hip joint and they have a less impact on the knee joints compared to exercises like squats.

Conor Harris has a great thread on the biomechanics of a lateral lunge and an informational YouTube Channel with more mobility exercises.

Caroline Girvan is also a great source for at-home workouts and even has a 10-minute leg workout focused solely on different variations of lunges!

Resources

Not sure where to start? We’ve got you covered!

Mobility

One of my favourites is Ben Patrick (@kneesovertoesguy on Instagram and YouTube). ATG Personal Training is a full body fitness system and I personally love their short videos over on Instagram, particularly on beginner-friendly mobility exercises.

Yoga

A great way to include mobility exercises into a training program is yoga. Yoga with Adriene is one of my personal inspirations – great for beginners and usually offers several modifications for difficult exercises.

Community

Join the Rewire Fitness discord server and chat with the community!

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How to use Visualization to achieve your goals

How to Use Visualization to Support Sport Performance

Many elite athletes such as Michael Phelps have used visualization techniques in preparation for competition. According to neuropsychological evidence, practicing visualization can help you achieve your sport performance goals. Visualization stimulates brain regions involved in movement rehearsal, priming the brain and body for action and, like physical practice, functions as training to improve real-life performance.

Our top strategies for using visualization to reach your sport performance goals:

  1. Get Clear and Specific on Your Goal: Be clear about what you are trying to achieve. Visualization works best when you are specific and detailed as it needs to be as close to reality as possible.
  2. Visualize the Full Sensory Experience of Reaching Your Sport Performance Goal: Make sure that you visualize the full sensory experience. The more sensations you bring in, the better the mental rehearsal. 
  3. Visualize it in Real-Time: For example, if you are visualizing a 100m sprint, the visualization should reflect the duration of time it will take for you to complete it. It is important for your visualization to be as close to the realistic event as possible. 
  4. Practice Frequently: Practice your visualization daily. Mentally rehearsing allows your skills to improve with repetition. 

Struggling to implement visualization into your day? The Rewire App will support you in your journey to achieving your sport performance goals!

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Achieve Your Fitness Goals

6 Tips for Achieving your Fitness Goals

Exercise and fitness goals are among the top New Year’s resolutions set by people each year, but many people fail to achieve or follow through on their resolutions.
People can fail to accomplish a goal for various reasons, including lacking the willpower to continue long-term, failing to make deliberate decisions, or forgetting about them altogether.

Continue reading for our top 6 tips to achieving your fitness goals so that you do not fall into these pitfalls!

1. Think about Your Why. 

Think about why you have set your goal and why it is important to you. Reflecting on your purpose for setting the goal will drive you to achieve it when motivation becomes low. 

2. Make Sure that Your Goals are Measurable.

Once a goal is set, make sure that it can also be measured so that you can carefully and continuously monitor your progress. Check whether the effort you are putting in is in line with what you were hoping to achieve. A re-calibration, a plan change, or an adjustment might be needed sometimes.

3. Narrow Down and Be Specific.

The number one mistake athletes make is that they set too many fitness goals. Narrow it down to the 1-2 goals that are the most important to you right now and make progress on them until you switch to something else. 

4. Build Your Self-Control. 

Whenever we set a goal, we have to exert effort that is outside of our regular routine which requires self control. You can start exercising your self-control by using neuro-training exercises on Rewire to build mental toughness.

5. Set Realistic Goals that are Optimally Challenging.

Make sure that the goals you set are difficult, but possible. You should have a fair chance at accomplishing them, but they cannot be too easy. Once you reach them, you will feel good and be ready to set new ones.

6. Boost Your Self-Efficacy.

According to Bandura’s (1997) Social-Cognitive Theory, self-efficacy refers to your beliefs about your ability to successfully perform certain actions. Studies in psychology have shown that boosting a person’s self-efficacy helps them perform better, focus attention more effectively, exert more effort, and remain optimistic in the face of challenges.

Visualization can be a great tool to help you prepare and succeed in achieving your fitness goals! Read more about how to use visualization to support sport performance here.

Are you ready to achieve your fitness goals and unlock your ultimate performance? Start Rewire free today!


Sources:

Bandura, A. (2012). Social cognitive theory. In P. A. M. Van Lange, A. W. Kruglanski, & E. T. Higgins (Eds.), Handbook of theories of social psychology (pp. 349–373). Sage Publications Ltd. https://doi.org/10.4135/9781446249215.n18

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Training For The Mind: Getting Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable

To the untrained eye, the reason that we exercise is to simply improve our fitness. We lift to improve our strength and build muscle and we go on long runs, swims or rides to develop our endurance. That is what, at the most basic level, training is all about – improving our athletic performance.

Sometimes I hear people disregard rest days and the importance of recovery. I usually laugh at this as the inner scientist in me cringes. At first glance, this attitude would seem to come from the false belief that improvements in our physiology occur in the gym and whilst exercising, rather than in our sleep and time spent recovering, and for the vast majority of people, it is likely to be true that they are incorrectly taking this ‘no rest’ approach with the aim of improving their fitness.

However, to some, there is more to training than simply improving fitness. To some, training is less about the body, than it is about the mind. Take David Goggins for example, he never has a rest day, and to many, this would seem crazy and futile. But, the most important thing to him when training is the development of his mental toughness. For some people, training is not about improving their body or fitness, these are just welcome bi-products. Instead, training is about the mind. Creating a high level of suffering to develop their mental toughness and themselves as a person.

‘Who on this f**king earth would be going right now? You are! I believed it enough to where my body said: “he’s not gonna stop”.’

David Goggins

I’m certainly not suggesting that you do go at 100% all the time, and you should give yourself time to rest and recover. But we can learn a lot from the mentality shown by Goggins: we should not be using science as an excuse for slacking. In that sense, you would only be cheating yourself. We should however use the science when it is correctly applied and take appropriate recovery for the our exercise. Indeed, by its very definition, you cannot recover without putting the work in first.

“At dawn, when you have trouble getting out of bed, tell yourself: “I have to go to work — as a human being. What do I have to complain of, if I’m going to do what I was born for — the things I was brought into the world to do? Or is this what I was created for? To huddle under the blankets and stay warm?”

Marcus Aurelius

If we cave in to feelings of needing to stop we our losing an internal battle with our mind, and the mind is immensely powerful. Under conditions of mental fatigue our endurance performance is shown to decrease significantly (1,2). Yet, the science shows that using Neuro Training over a 12-week programme was shown to yield 3x the improvement in athletic performance in a time-to-exhaustion trial (3). By putting our mind under uncomfortable conditions and testing our mental capacities we can break the boundaries of what was previously possible. Learn how we help athletes and those looking to level up their human performance increase their mental resilience.

“That’s one of my big things too is, you know, getting comfortable with being uncomfortable”

Laura Kline – Rewire Athlete

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References

1.        Marcora SM, Staiano W, Manning V. Mental fatigue impairs physical performance in humans. J Appl Physiol. 2009; 

2.        Lopes TR, Oliveira DM, Simurro PB, Akiba HT, Nakamura FY, Okano AH, et al. No Sex Difference in Mental Fatigue Effect on High-Level Runners’ Aerobic Performance. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 2020;Volume Pub. 

3.        Marcora SM, Staiano W, Merlini M. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Brain Endurance Training (BET) to Reduce Fatigue During Endurance Exercise. Med Sci Sport Exerc. 2015; 

Recommended Reading

Can’t Hurt Me
by David Goggins

Meditations
by Marcus Aurelius

The Obstacle is the Way
by Ryan Holiday

The Joe Rogan Experience #1212 – David Goggins

The Tim Ferriss Podcast: Ryan Holiday (#4)